The Bike Light

Yesterday I noticed a bike light I use when riding my scooter was broken. I was a little bit concerned, this was the first time I’d noticed the defect, a very clear crack that split the plastic right where the USB plug was. It was sticking out so badly that I might have broken something plugging it in, just glad I caught it. I know that’s a lot of anxiety over what is basically a repairable item, but I am risk-averse.

I found the manufacturer’s customer service form on their webpage. I then filled out the information, including the monopolistic online store of the oligarch I’m currently not trying to support.

I completed it and started my commute.

By commute I mean hitting shift windows and the left arrow key to switch my desktop from Desktop 3 to Desktop 1. My commute using this method is approximately three seconds, which by the way, is incredibly bad.

Do not do this.

I had a full day at work, figured out dinner, went to bed, woke up the next day and saw that I had received a response to my warranty inquiry. My documentation was accepted and they will replace the light, noting that the package would take about three to four weeks because it was coming from Australia, I learned.

As I was responding, I noticed a land acknowledgement in their signature.

Sent from Wurundjeri Country. I acknowledge the Traditional Owners of the land on which I work, and pay my respects to their Elders, past, present and future.

Wurundjeri Woi Wurrung Cultural Heritage Aboriginal Corporation

And while I know that a land acknowledgement is not going to solve the problems that indigenous people have faced for centuries, I have family that I know would appreciate the educational effort coming from a company. On the whole, I would rather give my money to a company that is at least trying in its own way to educate others and have respect for all human beings.

I snoozed the email for four weeks and signed off.

“May we all get treated like human beings, equally, some day, every one of us.”

//In retrospect I reread this and then realized I own enough tools at home to have glued it shut and filed and sanded it to a usable condition, but then I would have never seen the land acknowledgement.

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